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Airmen were able to seamlessly transition between platforms, which prevented a loss of MQ-9 capabilities for combatant commanders. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman James Thompson)
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Aircrew flew one of its last local sorties before the official retirement scheduled for March 9, 2018, at Creech. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman James Thompson)
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Airmen of the 432nd Wing/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing are transitioning to support an all MQ-9 force by the end of 2018.
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Airmen with the 432nd Maintenance Group demilitarized a few MQ-1s in their inventory before they were dispersed to England where they’ll be displayed in museums.
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As a standard practice, Airmen retain all salvageable parts during the process in an effort to save U.S. tax dollars and ensure the aircraft is safe for public display.
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Two MQ-1s were recently transported from Creech to two museums overseas where they will be used in historical aviation exhibits.
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This MQ-1 was one of two Predators that were demilitarized and sent to England to serve as a museum display and symbolizes the ties the U.S. Air Force has with our coalition partners.
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The MQ-1 served as a premier Remotely Piloted Aircraft for combatant commanders and coalition partners for more than 20 years and is scheduled to officially retire March 9, 2018, at Creech AFB.
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The MQ-1 was active for more than 20 years and evolved from a pure intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platform to later include persistent attack capabilities during that time. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman James Thompson)
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The Predator started as an RQ-1 in the late 1990s, providing only reconnaissance capabilities until the early 2000s, when it was equipped with two AGM-114 Hellfire missiles and designated as a multirole asset.
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Aircrew will fly the MQ-1 for the final time at Creech on March 9, 2018 before it is officially retired from the Air Force inventory. (U.S. Air Force photo by SMSgt Cecilio Ricardo)
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On May 9, 2017, the 15th ATKS celebrated their 100-year anniversary and reflected on the unit’s extensive and honorable heritage, which coincidentally, includes their use of airpower in nearly every major conflict of the 20th Century. This heritage is carried on in today’s fight with remotely piloted aircraft MQ-1 Predators. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class James Thompson)
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To combat the unique childcare challenges, personnel from the Air Force Services Activity headquarters in Joint Base San Antonio, Texas, recently met with military members here and conducted interviews where they discussed new and evolving care options for service members supporting the remotely piloted aircraft mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech Sgt. Nadine Barclay)
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An MQ-1 Predator sits on the flight line Dec. 8, 2016, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. The predator started as an RQ-1 in the late 1990s providing reconnaissance capabilities only until the early 2000s when it was equipped with two AGM-114 Hellfire missiles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christian Clausen)
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The GNAT 750 was the first long-endurance remotely piloted aircraft. After it was purchased by the United States Air Force, it would evolve into the RQ-1 Predator during the 1990s to fly its first missions over the Balkans during the Kosovo conflict. (Courtesy Photo)
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An MQ-9 Reaper sits on the flight line Nov. 22, 2016, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. The Reaper is an evolution of the MQ-1 Predator and can carry four AGM-114 Hellfire missiles and two 500 pound bombs while being able to fly for 18-24 hour missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christian Clausen)
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